Gary R. Dumond

Dumond, Gary R., Warrant Officer WO1, 335th Aviation Company (Assault Helicopter), 1 October 1970, Republic of Vietnam, is awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty. These men distinguished themselves by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as pilots of a helicopter during combat assault missions near Gigo Duc. These men coordinated and navigated their aircraft as it flew through adverse weather conditions to support the allies in locating enemy positions. As the aircraft flew at a low altitude, it began to take intense enemy ground fire. Immediately these men directed the door gun fire onto the enemy locations with deadly accuracy which resulted in three sampans sunk and 18 confirmed enemy troops neutralized. The above action was credited with the prevention of an attack on a nearby allied outpost. Through their courage and sound judgement coupled with their complete disregard for their own personal safety, these men contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission. Their professionalism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon themselves, their unit, and the United States Army………………… Dumond, Gary R., Warrant Officer WO1, 335th Aviation Company (Assault Helicopter) is awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (First Oak Leaf Cluster), 11 August 1970, Republic of Vietnam, for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty Warrant Officer Dumond distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as aircraft commander of an armed helicopter during combat assault missions near Cai Lay. During the early hours, his ship was scrambled to support an Allied outpost which was being overrun. Immediately after the aircraft arrived on station, it came under heavy automatic weapons and machine gun fire. Warrant Officer Dumond directed his door gunner to fire upon the enemy, and a large number of enemy soldiers were neutralized. After refueling he returned to the outpost, and again the enemy fired upon the ship. Without hesitation Warrant Officer Dumond again ordered his door gunner to return fire. During this fire fight the light ship had landed between two bunkers, and some of the crew jumped out of the aircraft to come to the aid of a wounded man. To give his comrades cover, Warrant Officer Dumond flew the aircraft back over the light ship and gave constant protection for the men on the ground. After the wounded man was put on board, the light ship flew back to My Tho where medical aid was waiting. It was later learned that the man was an Allied soldier and that if not for the rescue he would have died in the field. Warrant Officer Dumond’s courage and loyalty, coupled with his complete disregard for his own personal safety, contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission. His professionalism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.