William A. Eastman

#1) The President of the United States takes great pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to First Lieutenant William A. Eastman for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Eastman distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on the night of 11 December 1966 while serving as pilot of a helicopter on a “Firefly” team near Can Giuc. Alerted to enemy river traffic in the area, the team set out to put a stop to it. Despite intense ground fire, Lieutenant Eastman made numerous low firing passes, wreaking havoc on the insurgents. Realizing the threat posed by the enemy’s anti-aircraft emplacements, he also delivered effective covering fire as the team’s other gunship made its firing runs. Again and again he swooped down on the enemy vessels, smashing them to splinters with his accurate fire. By the end of the night, 69 supply-laden sampans had been sunk, a severe loss to the Viet Cong transportation network. First Lieutenant Eastman’s outstanding flying ability and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army. *******************************

#2) The President of the United States takes great pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to First Lieutenant William A. Eastman for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty. First Lieutenant Eastman distinguished himself while serving as pilot of the lead aircraft of a light fire team conducting search and destroy missions. During an attack on a suspected enemy position his aircraft commander was hit in the head by a small caliber projectile. He quickly took the controls and pulled the aircraft out of a dive. By this time all crew members were wounded. He disregarded his own wound as he braved heavy caliber weapons fire to make a firing pass on the enemy. He continued to make his firing pass and then flew out of the area. Rather than land in a close-by secure area, he flew the crippled aircraft to a hospital where his wounded crew could be treated. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.